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Accident-Proofing Farms and Stables

Marjorie R. Margentino, Former Program Associate in Animal Science; Karyn Malinowski, Ph.D., Director of the Equine Science Center; Sara R. Malone, Department of Animal Sciences

Revised July 2007

Fact Sheet #605

 

“Accident-proofing” your farm is one of the most important tasks you will ever do. It takes a lot of time, effort and planning to ensure that family, employees and visitors will be as safe as possible. Brief visitors on what to expect on the farm, and do not leave them unsupervised, to minimize the risk of accidents.

                              


 

Safety Recommendations for the Stable, Barn Yard, and Horse/Livestock Structures
Marjorie R. Margentino, Former Program Associate in Animal Science; Karyn Malinowski, Ph.D., Director of the Equine Science Center; Sara R. Malone, Department of Animal Sciences

Revised July 2007

Fact Sheet #606

 

Every year there are an alarming number of farm-related injuries nationwide. Farm owners and managers must make a concerted effort to ensure safety around the farm and reduce farm-related accidents. To help reduce the number of accidents and injuries to employees, visitors and stock, care needs to be taken to ensure that buildings and the surrounding areas meet common safety standards. This fact sheet will help owners and managers identify areas of concern and show how to correct any possible problems.

                              



Horse Trailer Maintenance and Trailering Safety

Marjorie R. Margentino, Former Program Associate in Animal Science; Karyn Malinowski, Ph.D., Director of the Equine Science Center; and Carey A. Williams, Ph.D., Extension Specialist in Equine Management; Sara R. Malone, Department of Animal Sciences

Updated July 2007
Fact Sheet #607

 

Horse owners will usually find it necessary at some point in time to trailer their horses. Trailering may be necessary at time of purchase, for horse shows, trail riding, or a medical emergency. Whatever the need, it is important to be prepared and knowledgeable about trailering safety. Poor preparation of the horse, trailer or towing vehicle can turn a pleasurable outing into a horse owner’s nightmare. Poor truck and trailer maintenance can result in traffic accidents or breakdowns. This fact sheet will discuss the basic concerns involved in horse trailer maintenance and trailering safety.

                                


 

Fire Prevention and Safety Measures Around the Farm
Marjorie R. Margentino, Former Program Associate in Animal Science; Karyn Malinowski, Ph.D., Director of the Equine Science Center; Sara R. Malone, Department of Animal Sciences

Updated July 2007

Fact Sheet #608

 

Barn fires are a farm owner’s worst nightmare. Most have tragic results, such as the loss of human life, animals, valuable equipment or the building itself. Summer fires are often the result of electrical storms or spontaneous combustion of hot hay. Winter fires are caused by appliances, rodents chewing through electrical wires or the accumulation of dust and cobwebs on electrical surfaces. This fact sheet will explain to horse owners and others the short and long term precautions that should be taken to help reduce the incidence of barn fires.

                              


 

Farm Machinery and Equipment Safety Part I:

Recognizing and Understanding the Hazards
Marjorie R. Margentino, Former Program Associate in Animal Science; Karyn Malinowski, Ph.D., Director of the Equine Science Center; Sara R. Malone, Department of Animal Sciences

Updated July 2007

Fact Sheet #619

Farming is one of the most dangerous occupations in the United States. Mechanical, chemical and environmental hazards put agricultural workers at risk for accidents. Over 700 farmers die in work-related accidents yearly. Many of these deaths are due to tractor roll-over and mishaps with other machinery.

                              
 

Farm Machinery and Equipment Safety Part II:

Preventing Machinery Accidents During Operation
Marjorie R. Margentino, Former Program Associate in Animal Science; Karyn Malinowski, Ph.D., Director of the Equine Science Center

Updated September 2007

Fact Sheet #620

It is important to be safety conscious when doing any job that requires the use of machinery. Statistics show that the majority of machinery-related accidents occur as the result of human negligence. Errors include: taking shortcuts to save time; failing to read the operator’s manual; ignoring a warning; improper or insufficient instruction; failing to follow safety rules; and improper or inadequate maintenance.

                              

 

 

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© 2009 Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Items may be reprinted with permission from the
Director of the Equine Science Center:

esc@njaes.rutgers.edu


The Equine Science Center is a unit of
Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.